A Brief History of Graphics

November 23 2014
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzN2pgL0zeg "From naïve origins to the rise of cinematic realism: an account of graphical milestones in video games." A very nice 5 part series: Pixel Pioneers: A Brief History of Graphics, Part One Sprite Supreme: A Brief History of Graphics, Part Two Polygon Realm: A Brief History of Graphics, Part Three Voodoo Bloom: A Brief History of Graphics, Part Four Future Crisis: A Brief History of Graphics, Part Five

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free as a ….

November 19 2014
Birdly, a full immersion, full body, bird-flight simulator, including wind, sound, smell... https://vimeo.com/91069214 presented at SIGGRAPH'14, Conference for Computer Graphics and Interaction Techniques. Awesome! Would love to try that. What would you want to experience next? Slither like a snake? Swim like a dolphin? Dig like a mole? Have a look at more cutting and bleeding edge stuff on the SIGGRAPH'14 previews page.

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Creative Code – Robert Hodgin at Eyeo Festival

November 7 2014
https://vimeo.com/103537259 Robert Hodgin talks about his beautiful real-time simulations of flocking behaviors. Fascinating in this talk is the way he presents his coding as a tool for exploring, phenomena, behaviors and experiences. (have a look at his previous talks at Eyeo, fascinating stuff)  

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The Grid | AI Websites That Design Themselves

November 1 2014
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXA4-5x31V0 "This is not another do-it-yourself website builder. The Grid harnesses the power of artificial intelligence to take everything you throw at it - videos, images, text, urls and more - and automatically shape them into a custom website unique to you. As your needs grow, it evolves with you, effortlessly adapting to your needs. Our algorithms expertly analyze your media and apply color palettes that keep your messaging consistent and unique. The Grid also detects color contrasts, automatically adjusting typographic color to maximize legibility. What's possible when an AI does all the hard work for you? You can get things done, even on the go. Drag-n-drop builders don't play nice with fingers on phones, but AI works perfectly, anywhere. Never again change your content to fit your template or the latest hot mobile device. The layout changes as you add content, and adapts to look great and work flawlessly no matter where your users find you. It’s as easy as that. Actually, it’s incredibly complicated, but The Grid figures it out so you don’t have to. Join the evolution today at http://www.thegrid.io."

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Moff – a wearable smart toy

November 1 2014
http://vimeo.com/87380174 Everything you do. Everything you hold. Change into toys. http://www.moff.mobi

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3D Printer x Tattoo Machine

October 29 2014
Anyone wants a new tattoo? https://vimeo.com/102613692 Read more at dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/2014/10/28/appropriate-audiences-tatoue-hacked-3d-printer-tattoo-machine/

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Flesh Computer

October 26 2014
http://vimeo.com/108751357 Weird and strange, but still interesting. http://www.fleshcomputer.com

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Beyond Projection Mapping

October 19 2014
https://vimeo.com/107162592 https://vimeo.com/105926747

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How many years does it take to change a light bulb?

October 19 2014
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVUTEVZCqsg A nice little video from Philips: "Our homes have changed radically over the past century". http://www.meethue.com

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Behind the Mic: The Science of Talking with Computers

October 18 2014
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxxRAHVtafI Nice little video from Google on speech recognition and voice interaction with computing devices. "Language. Easy for humans to understand (most of the time), but not so easy for computers. This is a short film about speech recognition, language understanding, neural nets, and using our voices to communicate with the technology around us."

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What is interaction design?

October 9 2014
or rather, What do interaction designers do? At the end of the Experience Prototyping course at UID, the students raised that question. It is a rather fundamental one, and impossible to answer in one single way and it will be different for anyone that considers themself to be working in this field. Very recently, one way of thinking about such questions was eloquently sketched by Joep Frens in his Nierenberg Lecture at the design department of Carnegy Melon University in Pitsburg on October 1st, 2014. https://vimeo.com/108268795 (Joep came to teach one week of Experience Prototyping at UID in 2011)

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TEI’15 Student Design Challenge

October 7 2014
cropped-TEI-head_helvetica_updated Important Dates October 22, 2014, 11:59 pm PST: Entry submission deadline November 22, 2014: Notification of Acceptance December 5, 2014, 11:59 pm PST: Student Design Challenge team commitment and registration The Challenge The Internet of Things is curiously lacking in knobs and switches. Instead, it’s controlled by a collection of glass rectangles. Our hands do more than just touch and swipe, however. We have fingers that can feel, pinch, grip, turn, and point. They are attached to our arms, which act as levers to amplify the force we can exert with our hands. Our hands and arms are covered with nerve endings that give us intelligence about the world we live in that our eyes and ears can’t fully deliver. History is littered with tools we’ve designed to take full advantage of our hands. Even into the early electronic era, we have designed wonderfully informative tangible tools. Great tangible controls are not just input devices. They act as physical indicators of the state of a system that we read through our hands. The click of a switch gives us haptic feedback that the device has heard our commands. The arrangement of a row of sliders reads like a graph to our fingers. Good tangible interfaces are also well-coupled with the things they control, providing an immediate feedback loop. The feedback from a steering mechanism makes your body a part of the vehicle’s movement, encouraging you to rely on more than just your eyes and ears. Everyday appliances have grown some wonderful new features thanks to digital technologies. Home lighting is no longer just white light, nor need it be strictly turned on and off with a single switch. Lighting designers (and consumers) can now play with color, intensity, and time in their lamps. Yet tablet device interfaces lack the convenience and immediacy of the switch, particularly when you’re fumbling in the dark. How can you deliver on the promise of these new features, yet retain the convenience and tangible intelligence of the switch? This year’s design challenge is to imagine a digital present that takes full advantage of the capabilities of your hands and arms and delivers not only control, but also feedback about the system it controls. What the everyday tangible controls of our daily life for the 21st century. What’s the best tangible light switch for the Philips Hue? What’s the track selector on a Spotify jukebox? What controls give a media editor the ability to think through his work with his body, shifting pieces, clipping and extending with his hands and arms? Design so that your user can take full advantage of the capabilities of her hands, both operating and learning from touch, feel, and position. Use no sound, and no more than 64 pixels* in your final design. Imagine devices that that allow your user to keep her eyes and ears on the task, not on the controls. More info at http://www.tei-conf.org/15/student-design-competition

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FlexSense: A Transparent Self-Sensing Deformable Surface

October 7 2014
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Jo9ww9cLzg

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Hybrid Interactions with Phones on Computer Screens (MIT)

September 26 2014
http://vimeo.com/105950126

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Physical Charts

September 22 2014
3Charts The amazing folks at Microsoft Research Cambridge have come up with a few mechanical contraptions that elegantly represent data in the tangible and physical world. Here is the description of the project, from the web page: The physical charts are an attempt to make data and data visualisations legible to ordinary people in their daily lives. In response to the increasing sophistication of data visualisations and the seemingly unquestioning quest for novelty, the charts make playful use of long established and highly familiar representations like pie charts and bar graphs. Rather than estrange viewers, the objective is to enable them to, at a glance, engage with and comprehend data. The physical and dynamic qualities of the charts are intended to draw people in to viewing data, differentiating them from screen-based visualisations that are beginning to lose their salience in our information-rich environments. The beauty of the charts is in how simple they are to read and how the physical mechanics produce strikingly visual (and tactile) representations of data. Check the videos at http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/cambridge/projects/physicalcharts The Physical Charts were designed and built by David Sweeney - with software development from Tim Regan and Alex Butler.

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